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Generosity times 2: Mint shares it in an art show and in our first calendar

This 2020 Paint Detroit with Generosity piece was painted by Mint summer worker Eleanor Aro; it is our symbol for the 2020 PDWG show.

Generosity will show up in two beautiful and inspiring ways from Mint Artists Guild this fall and winter.

The first: Mint has created a calendar honoring five years of Paint Detroit with Generosity paintings donated to local causes. It gives 13 beautiful images to brighten every month of 2021.

The second: Mint is sharing 25 original paintings, created by our youth workers this summer during the pandemic, at Durfee Innovation Society.  Durfee seems like the perfect place this year because many of its tenants support children and youth; the Detroit Youth Choir practices there and it is about to open an arcade to encourage children to do well in school.  

We hope to see the paintings while the Detroit Youth Choir practices or perhaps while checking out a spirited game of wheelchair basketball in Durfee’s gymnasium and event space.  We will not have an event opening because of covid-19, however, if you have a small group and wish to book a guided tour of the 2020 Paint Detroit with Generosity show, please contact us.

Mint will donate all 2020 Paint Detroit with Generosity paintings to organizations serving children and youth. The paintings will hang in the first floor main corridor and second floor east wing; safety precautions for guests include required masks and a temperature check when entering.

Celebrate youth art, beauty and generosity throughout 2021 with Mint’s first calendar.

In our first calendar, we honor creative work by Mint summer workers and 13 local nonprofits, our partners in the Paint Detroit with Generosity initiative since 2016.  Each page contains a brief description of their mission and work along with a favorite painting Mint donated to them. Among the nonprofits featured are Arts & Scraps, Freedom House, Mercy Education Project, Mittens for Detroit and People for Palmer Park, which helps provide our wonderful studio space.  Initial funding for the calendar was provided by The Skillman Foundation, which also supports the overall Paint Detroit with Generosity initiative.

The Paint Detroit with Generosity calendar is for sale in the Mint Shop online.  Buy a calendar and  help us hire more youth next summer.

The calendar joins a growing array available from Mint this holiday season. Among the offerings are Mint greeting cards and our limited edition, archival Mint prints including the new Aretha Franklin print.

Guests may nominate a nonprofit to receive one of two abstract paintings when they visit Paint Detroit with Generosity at Durfee Innovation Society. The Mint exhibit will be up through Dec. 27; Durfee is open Monday through Saturdays.

Paint Detroit with Generosity is underwritten by Michigan Council for the Arts and Cultural Affairs, Culture Source, The Skillman Foundation, Grow Detroit’s Young Talents and Blossoms florists. It also is supported by individual donors.

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Delicious candy crafts to make, not eat, this fall

Get creative with fall crafts, including some with food and candy. (Photo: Bee Felten-Leidel / Unsplash)

Halloween and Thanksgiving will look different this year – perhaps very different.  Because of a global pandemic, we need to be careful and creative about how we celebrate.

Mint wants to encourage more creativity – by recommending three arts and crafts that are created with candy. Pick up the necessary sweets at a community Halloween or buy it at a supermarket or dollar store. Make sure you buy enough to munch on as you are working.

These activities are not specifically for Halloween but they could work at a Day of the Dead / Dia de los Muertos, Harvest or other celebration too.

Create a wreath using gumdrops or hard candies. (Photo: Joyful Scribblings)

Gumdrop decorator wreath – This beauty works equally well for fall, for the December holidays or a birthday.  Step by step instructions on creating it may be found on A Pretty Cool Life blog. And remember, this wreath must stay inside; outdoors and the squirrels or birds will scramble away with a sugar high.

Soda can candy bouquet – This bouquet will look great on your table and also could be a delicious gift for grandma or a teacher or neighbor with a sweet tooth. So perhaps you make two, following these instructions by Miss Kopy Kat. She is a blogger named Gayle, and she buys everything at a dollar store. Figure on spending $10 or so to make two of these sweet bouquets.

Sugar skulls often sit on an offenda during Dia de los Muertos. (Photo: Morguefile)

Sugar skulls –  These traditions come from Mexico and Latin America’s Day of the Dead celebrations. Known as Calavera, sugar skulls often are placed on ofrendas, alters to ancestors.  They work best when made with skull molds and require 24 hours to allow drying time. Follow the video instructions created by Beth Jackson Klosterboer, of Hungry Happenings (with affiliate links). Or use the simple recipe and crafty kid-friendly instructions shared by Hola Jalepeno.

Of course, we  encourage you to paint your pumpkins or ghords and collage and mosaic your candy into temporary designs, then photograph them. Please tag @mintartistsguild on your candy / creative projects.

For more ideas, check out our Pinterest on Arts and craft ideas, including some Halloween treats like witches finger cookies.  (If you make these, save some for us. We will be by to chew on them!)

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Stick with us for beautiful stickers and holiday gifts

Buy this trio of stickers together for more beauty and affirmation.

Mint Artists Guild is creating a lot of momentum in our programs and community activities. Now, we have extending that to merchandise. We just developed a new line of beautiful and inspiring stickers, all based on youth art.

We launch the first three today in our online Mint Shop.  These three stickers all are based on paintings created in the Mint Creative Summer Jobs program.  They join the Mint greeting cards and Mint prints, plus our first poster focused on social justice and a very few pieces of original art, all for sale through our website.

Stickers have become a form of self expression, creativity and caring about causes.  College students in Michigan and Virginia share their personality, passions, positivity and their love of dogs, sports, bands or travel through stickers. Stickers are placed on hotel room doors to certify the rooms are sanitized. A Dallas chef created a sticker line to celebrate friendship and her Latina culture with sugar skulls and tacos.  

Stickers have been around for decades. They started as bumper stickers to share sentiments on cars and trucks and grew to include stickers for laptops and devices, for nails, for water bottles, windows and other places.

For Mint, stickers are a way to share youth art and encourage and inspire individuals to more beauty, faith in themselves and their futures and generosity. That’s why we sell our stickers in twos or threes. So when you buy them, you have one to share and one for yourself.

Generosity, after all, is beautiful. Just like our stickers!

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Our Heroes: See them now at the Scarab Club in Midtown Detroit

Hero paintings by Zora Flounory and Alexis Bagley; © Mint Artists Guild, 2020

In  challenging times, the world needs heroes. We invite you to find one in these small portraits created by Mint Artists Guild.

These 15 small paintings will carry a big impact. And as the exhibit’s title Heroes: Now & Then reminds us, heroes may not be heroic every day. Occasional heroes and unknown heroes also deserve celebration.

Each portrait was created by a Detroit youth artist working for Mint during the pandemic, working from their homes. They chose their own heroes – and they are a diverse group from many eras and from today’s headlines.

The show debuts this Wednesday, Sept. 2, at the Scarab Club and will be up through Oct. 10.

The Heroes: Now & Then show shares at least three lesser known heroes:

Willem Arondeus, a Dutch writer, artist and activist, joined the resistance against the Nazis. His main job was to falsify papers for Jews in the Netherlands.  Painted by Mint summer worker Vianca Romero,  Arondeus saved hundreds or perhaps thousands of Jews from death, only to be executed himself. His final days are the subject of a short historical film called Willem.

Angela Davis, a civil rights leader, also worked on behalf of black prisoners and for LBGTQ rights. She appeared on the FBI’s most wanted list and later was acquitted of all charges. Angela Davis, painted by Mint summer worker Michael Johnson, has written many books and taught at universities. Read more about her in this Academic Kids post.  

Woman from the Gulabi Gang.  Started in Northern India in 2006, this group of women activists protect other women from domestic abuse, violence and the patriarchal system. Gulabi means pink in Hindi. “I get a lot of respect and dignity when I wear the pink sari,” says Maya Davy, a mother of five told the CBC. Painted by Mint summer worker Zora Flourony,  some Gulabi Gang members now drive taxis, taking on that male bastion.

Note that we are not sharing images these portraits in our blog because we really want people to go to The Scarab Club to see them.  The show is upstairs in its beautiful and historic building, next to the plein air paintings. Plus the main exhibit is photographs, so now we’ve shared three reasons to visit.  (The Scarab Club is open 12 to 5 Wednesday through Sunday, and has a small parking  at 217 Farnsworth, Detroit, directly behind the DIA.)

After you’ve visited our heroes, please wander a couple of blocks to Hannan Center to see our Abuela, Grandma, Bibi exhibit through Sept. 30. (It is closed weekends.) Because of covid-19 limits and safety protections, please call Hannan ahead to reserve; 313-833-1300 x. 0.  Or head to the DIA Museum Store or the Detroit Artists Market and buy Mint greeting cards.

Please subscribe to our blog. In a future post, Mint will recommend hero books for children and teens, books mostly selected by independent bookstore staff.

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Why Will Langford believes in our new Youth Arts Competition

Will Langford visits a Sheefy McFlymural in Eastern Market. (Photo by © Will Langford, using a tripod)

When we leap into something new and big, it helps to bring along an optimist and a make-magic-happen person like Will Langford.

Known as Will The Poet, he has a history of helping Mint and our young artists. And he also served as the voice of Michigan State University’s “Empower Extraordinary” campaign. He will use his positive energies and extraordinary network in Detroit to lead Mint in a new initiative: the Metro Detroit Youth Arts Competition.  It launched this week and runs through Aug. 4.

He was the first and best choice when Mint executive director Vickie Elmer came up with the idea to create a competition to engage and encourage children to be creative in these challenging times. He immediately said yes.

“I’ve engaged in the Metro Detroit Youth Arts Competition because I believe that Detroit is wealthy beyond our wildest dreams—in that our youth bear such light, intellect, and sheer talent,” said Langford.  “And Detroit is home to that undeniably spirit of hustle and hope, because when I look around me, I see artists, educators, parents, business owners, and co-conspirators who are committed to the growth of the Motor City.”

Children and youth who are age 21 or younger, as of Aug. 4, and live in Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties in Michigan are encouraged to create visual art or poetry based on the three prompts Will wrote.

Those prompts and a lot of other information about the Youth Arts Competition are available on our website.  Completed poetry and art also may be uploaded there.

Will Langford is a Detroit native, a poet, teaching artist, and Fulbright scholar. He is the 2017 Motown Mic Spoken Word Artist of the Year. He divides his energy between education and community development projects in his hometown, East Africa, and the East Lansing area, where he is a Ph.D. student at Michigan State in curriculum Instruction and teacher education.

Will “The Poet” Langford (Photo: © Rachel Laws Myers, used with permission

Will joined the Mint board of directors in January.  Yet he already is well known as an active Mint supporter, a volunteer and ambassador who buys Mint art.

His idea for blackout poetry was featured in the Mint blog series Creative Ideas for Challenging Times.  And since Mint regularly brings poetry into its Creative Summer Jobs program, it was easy and smart to add poems to our competition this summer.

Now Will is working to bring in businesses and nonprofits that believe in children and creativity and will donate prizes, awards cash or promotion to our competition. He and Mint have landed some beauties including Arts & Scraps, Avalon International Breads, Confident Brands, Jo’s Gallery, North End Customs, Sherwood Forest Art Gallery and others.  We welcome your organization to join us in this joyful initiative; email us at mintartistsguild@gmail.com if you’re interested.

And we hope that you or your children, grandchildren, nieces, cousins, siblings, best friends, roommates and others who are 21 or less will enter the Metro Detroit Youth Arts Competition.  Will cannot wait to see what you write, draw or create!

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Freedom! Live life frugally this summer

Visit garage sales to find economical art supplies. (Photo: Lesley Epling / Morguefile)

This summer,  more than most, artists need to economize. They may find themselves with no art fairs, with galleries closed or gone and regular buyers feeling frugal themselves.  Unemployment is high and uncertainty is too.

So it’s the perfect time to learn to live and create on the cheap. Follow the lead of model and television star Tyra Banks, who said: “I’m frugal. I’ve always been this way. When I was young, my mom would give me my allowance, and I’d peel off a little each week and have some to spare.”

Create a more independent approach to living by cutting your spending – and increasing your future possibilities. Here’s some ideas for emerging artists:

Develop a frugal outlook.  Some people grow up with this, following their mom or aunt to yard sales. Others must work to ingrain a make the most with the least mindset in their lives and creative practices.  Start with a living life large on the cheap mantra, or borrow mine: “I live an abundant life on a modest paycheck.”

Get creative. Reuse items in your art. Develop a mixed media series glued and painted on old cookie sheets. Or concoct a project using blueprints as the backdrop. Create a list of possible materials:  Old windows and doors work well as canvases to paint and some artists create on records or books. Sculptors may remake old metal shelves or rakes and shovels.

Find joy in the journey.  Your approach to frugality should make it fun or an adventure.  Create a “cheapskate challenge” with your siblings or friends. Plant peppers or potatoes or find one of the many free food handouts that are all around these days. Plan dinner with four friends at home instead of heading to a bar or restaurant. Log how many days you go without buying anything online, and celebrate when you hit 30.

Find it for free on Craigslist and Nextdoor.  Search in a few areas, starting in the “free” section. Then look for garage sales, gigs and other items for sale.  If you are really looking for something specific, consider placing an ad as a way to land what you need. Be clear that your budget is tiny.

Head to estate sales or flea markets to find unconventional art supplies. (Photo Alexander Shustov / Unsplash)

Shop garage and estate sales.   You will find plentiful options in the summer and fall. Head to estatesales.net or download a garage sale locator app to identify where you’re going.  Look for multi-family sales or church sales for a wider array of items. We recommend showing on on the final day, when prices are discounted by 50 to 75 percent.

Find flea markets and junk yards.  Grab your mask and gloves and go after some real bargains. But don’t buy it just because it’s affordable. Buy it because you need it for your art, your family or your future.

And follow our other tips on smart and affordable paint brushes and materials.

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Backyard creativity: New outdoor activities for youth, for all

Create a backyard water park. (Photo: Ali Yahya / Unsplash)

 

Summertime art and creative play deserves to take place outside, or using materials picked up in a park or woods.

So we are offering four new ways to engage your creativity and make something joyful outdoors, in this new chapter of our Creativity for Challenging Times posts. 

Plein air painting.  You don’t have to have a huge wall for a mural. Start with a small canvas or board and set up your easel in your backyard to paint. Or sketch the scene, if painting seems too difficult. After you practice a few times, you may be ready to head to a city park to paint or sketch. Here are seven pointers for beginners from Draw Paint Academy.

Rock their world.   Paint some rocks with bugs or flowers, birds or pigs  or other natural elements. Or perhaps you want to paint faces on them.

Create a painted rock – then leave it somewhere as a gift for someone to find. (MorgueFile photo)

Some people put simple messages – Kindness rocks or Unity or Love – on their rocks.  Remember to choose smooth flatter rocks and clean them thoroughly before painting. If you want to join the rock sharing movement, this blog post offers helpful ideas and some beautiful examples.

Family water park.  Get creative on how this looks in your yard, from an old fashioned sprinkler to a water balloon piñata and more ideas from Kiplinger.   A kiddie pool could be more fun if it’s filled with bubble bath or if everyone has to share a five-sentence fairy tale about the magic pond before they can step in it.

Artsy walking stick.  Find a sturdy stick or branch that has dried out a bit. Bring it home and paint and decorate it with ribbons, leather ties, feathers or other items. You will end up with a beautiful one-of-a-kind walking stick or magic stick.

For more nature art ideas, we look to the blog To and Fro Families for 33 nature craft ideas or check out the 23 ideas for younger children from Hands On As We Grow. Or try painting using a twig or flower, using our previous blog post Creativity during Challenging Times.

 

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Doodle and watch documentaries

Schedule time to sketch and doodle. (Photo: Unsplash)

It’s time to explore the world, to meet artists and to share our rainbows of  everyday or surprising objects .

This week’s Creativity for Challenging Times episode features three ways to add a little joy and newness into your life.  For more ideas, we recommend going back to the first one or second one to score some other ideas.

Here’s our new projects in episode nine:

Doodle.   Set your timer for 30 or 35 minutes and just daydream with your pencil.  Draw anything and everything that comes to mind. At the end of that time, head to Doodlers Anonymous or a similar drawing site to join communities and drawing challenges.   Challenge yourself to doodle for an hour a day – or 30 minutes if your schedule is slammed – every day for a week.

Dip into documentaries. Be like artist Hubert Massey and alternate between science and art subjects. Or watch these eight documentaries about Detroit.  Or tune into documentaries about artists and photographers, selected by Widewalls, an online art magazine..

Rainbow scavenger hunt. This idea from Living Arts teacher Stephanie Mae works as a competition between siblings or a challenge among art friends. Gather many items – in the rainbow of colors. Then group them and pose them and photograph them.  Post your work and be sure to tag Mint and Living Arts.

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Chalk creativity and creating hope

Mint Artists Blake Hern helped us launch the Cheerful Chalk Challenge with this beauty on Detroit’s East Side. (Photo: Blake Hern)

 

From hopscotch to tic-tac-toe,  there’s plenty of ways chalk can cure your boredom. It’s perfect for spring and summer activities. So we hope you join Mint Artists Guild’s Cheerful #ChalkChallenge

We launched this last week and already are seeing sidewalk art and encouraging messages in Detroit and around the country and the world, some under the #chalkyourwalk hashtag.  

So here’s two more ways to join the chalk fun and two other creative ways to engage while sheltering at home:

Chalk caricatures. Chalk is a tricky medium to work with, messy yet fun. Test your own and a friend’s artistic skills and draw each other as funny exaggerated characters, using phone photos. If you’re up for a real challenge, try doing it together – at least 6 feet apart. Funniest drawing wins all the marbles.

Have a family photoshoot.   Family photo shoots and portraits have been around for centuries for royalty and wealthy families, then for more  families through the 1960s, 1970s and 80s. Let’s bring them back.  Pastbook offers 30 creative family photo ideas. Put on your fanciest or silliest threads.  Set up your smartphone/camera and take a photo to document this monumental time in our history.

Mint Artists Michael Johnson left a positive message on his sidewalk. (Photo: Michael Johnson)

Spread the creativity and inspiration. Go around your neighborhood leaving inspiration quotes for all the world to see! You’d be surprised at how much the little positive things affects others greatly. So grab some chalk and go make a difference. 

Create your  family tree.  With everyone being safe at home, this is a perfect time to interview  relatives who live with you or call those who don’t.  Turn this into a fun interview-style activity to learn more about your roots. Use this family history questionnaire – 175 questions from Bobcats World – to start a journey of discovery.  Follow our previous posts with advice on interviewing your Grandma. 

Check back next week for more creative activities for challenging times.  If you want to recommend some, please email us your ideas!

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More creative ideas: Dance, sidewalk messages and art made from nature

Learn contemporary or traditional dance. (Photo: Murilo Bahia / Unsplash)
Join in the cheerful chalk challenge. This was created by Mint Artists’ Eleanor Aro.

 

It’s lucky week seven of our creative activities and we know you’re ready swing into spring and get outside for some of your creative activities.

So grab some sidewalk chalk, stretch your muscles and take your sketch book outdoors. Let’s get started on some new or renewed creative projects.

Create nature art.  It’s Earth Day and its springtime, so make things from nature’s bounty and beauty. Gather stones from a neighborhood park. Pick seven different leaves and lay them into an art piece. Use sticks and mud and bits and pieces gathered during a long walk to create. Or turn bunches of leaves and flowers into “nature’s paintbrushes.”  For inspiration, read the Artful Parents interview of artist Richard Shilling who calls it “land art.”  For more ideas on marking Earth Day, unsubscribe to catalogs and try more ideas from Teen Vogue.

Dance like nobody’s watching. Learn how to ballroom dance – fox trot, cha cha or other steps. Or try modern dance or tap dance – as long as your dance partner is yourself or someone who is at home with you. Dance inside – our outside. Look into one of many free online lessons from The Dance Store or Learn to Dance or others. Or check out dance options from Dance Lives in Detroit, a new local nonprofit resource.

Do a DIY day:  Create your own journal or a sketch book. This JelArts tutorial shows how to be crafty and save money by making a sketchbook at home. Paint on your favorite pair of jeans. Jimena Reno shows how to paint and turn them into a unique fashion statement.  These suggestions from Mint marketing intern Journey Shamily are crafty and creative fun ways to make the

Join in the cheerful chalk challenge. This was created by Mint Artists’ Eleanor Aro.

world your canvas. 

Create with sidewalk chalk.   Join Mint Artists Guild and several other nonprofits in the cheerful chalk challenge, a way to encourage families to go outside for activity and play and then create an upbeat message or piece of art using sidewalk chalk.  Follow all safety rules as required by state and federal mandates.  Share your chalk art on social media with the #chalkchallenge and #chalkyourwalk hashtags and send your best image to us to share.