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Three tools for a successful summer job hunt

If springtime has you dreaming of a summer job that brings money and joy, it’s time to get serious about your resume and your storytelling skills.

Jobs will be available and in some beautiful places exploring National Forests or welcoming guests to  Mackinac Island . Yet they may be more competitive or less plentiful. Tourism and hospitality employment remains the worst affected of any sector: 39 percent below February 2020.

While not all employers will be hiring this year, those that will are seeking someone who will contribute to their organization – and often someone who will return the next summer or as a full-time staffer.

With that in mind, it’s time to start preparing for your summer job search.  Here are three essential tools anyone – ages 12 to 102 – needs to land a job for the summer or for longer:

Resume.  This is both a summary of your experience and skills and a sales document designed to impress a potential boss.  Read this step by step on creating a teen resume from USNews or follow this guide for creating a high school resume by job search expert Alison Doyle. Here’s a resume guide for college students. Then ask two adults to edit, proof and propose improvements to your resume.

Not all young people create resumes so those who have them stand out and seem more prepared and polished and professional.

If you have worked a few jobs or internships, you also may want to develop a LinkedIn profile  – and when you do, please follow Mint!

References.  These people who know you well may make the difference between a job offer and a polite thank you. They also are Exhibit A about why you want to impress and assist your teachers, especially those who educate in fields where you may want to work. References also may be leaders in your faith community, someone you volunteered with consistently, a family friend who you helped with tasks such as babysitting or painting a house and a former coach or club leader.

Check in with them now and update them on your plans and progress.  Find out how they prefer to be contacted and if there are any times when they are not available to give references. If you really want to be proactive, create short videos of your reference talking about you and your work ethic and share that after your interview.

Stories of your success.   Some job search experts offer tips for a great job interview. Others suggest you prepare for the most common interview questions. Those both certainly are worthwhile but the most valuable is getting comfortable with telling your story and highlighting your talents and successes.  Think up a story or three where you saved the day or solved a problem or created something beautiful or magical or impactful.

“A perfectly placed, impeccably delivered story can transport a person to a place beyond interested, straight past paying attention, and into a state of complete captivation,” said Kindra Hall, a speaker, consultant author of the book Stories That Stick. 

“You know stories will make you stand out,” she said in a video about making an exceptional first impression.  So prepare your stories and practice them so that even if you are nervous you will tell it well.

Videotape yourself telling the story so you can see how you look and sound.  Check out some of our Mint Artists videos on our YouTube channel .

Duct tape flower pens © De’Shaia Ventour

Among them is De’Shaia Ventour, who launched her duct tape accessories and art business with Mint.  She shares how much she has learned and developed – and her favorite day with Mint – in this short video.

Or imagine former Mint marketing intern Sydney Catton sharing stories from working in a coffee shop – or of chasing goats.   Sydney recently landed a full-time job and so we will soon introduce our new marketing intern here on the Mint blog.

Artists, of course, will need to create a portfolio of their work, and should create one that includes recent work and their very best pieces.  Yet these do not take the place of stories in an interview.

If you aren’t sure where to look for a summer job, follow Mint on Twitter and watch for some ideas and tips, offered every week. Or look up your city’s summer youth employment program or the parks and recreation department hiring plans. In Detroit, look at GDYT and the jobs will be virtual again this year.

If you want to apply for a summer job with Mint, read our frequently asked questions and then drop us a line!

© Vickie Elmer, 2021

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TaNiah McQueen: Mint Alumni combines creative artist and caring nurse

TaNiah McQueen has always been a care-giver since she was a girl. She remembers taking care of family pets and always being interested in medical equipment.  

More recently, as a second-year nursing student, her care extended to larger groups; she gave about 50 covid-19 vaccines to individuals at TCF Center in downtown Detroit and on another day, in a nursing home.

She’s always loves to create art, and especially art that feels natural and beautiful such as trees or flowers. TaNiah joined Mint Artists Guild’s first Learn and Earn program while attending Cass Technical High School. She was in the same initial cohort as alumni Ackeem Salmon.

She created many florals, including a large painting overflowing with roses. It became Roses roses, one of our best-selling greeting cards.  Then TaNiah donated the original painting to Mint in appreciation for all she gained and learned with us.  She participated in several art fairs, selling paintings, jewelry and more. And as a Mint Alumni, her work appeared in the Secret Garden at the Belle Isle Art Fair and in some holiday pop ups.

This huge floral painting briefly appeared at the Belle Isle Art Fair Secret Garden. © Taniah McQueen

Yet her career path headed straight toward nursing, and her caring for others through sickness. She pursued it with dedication at Wayne State University. She has worked at local hospitals and volunteered last fall to give flu shots at the Wayne State’s Campus Medical Clinic.

At TCF, she joined a group of nursing students who helped out for two days. Some people came in and were frightened to take the vaccine. “Don’t worry. I’m a pro at this,” TaNiah told them. 

Getting into nursing school wasn’t easy but TaNiah persevered. And as she did, the art she created started to reflect her study of human anatomy and the body. She painted beautiful human hearts and lungs after an anatomy class helped her draw them more precisely.

“The human body really is art too,” TaNiah told us. “The body, nature and life itself is where a lot of my inspiration comes from.”

She sees science and art as “very much connected” as art imitates life and reflects its nuances.

TaNiah McQueen’s painting shows lungs growing. © TaNiah McQueen

This summer, she will work in a pediatric clinic, travel and spend more time on art making. (She recently started experimenting in resins.) After graduation, expects to work in a hospital as an intensive care unit nurse, or perhaps in a hospital’s neonatal intensive care unit. She plans to go back for her doctoral degree, focused on the Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice. And yes, she expects to continue making art.

Some day, her work may hang in a hospital’s halls and help a visitor de-stress, as TaNiah McQueen scrubs in to save a patient.

Advice: “Stay focused. … Don’t be afraid try out new techniques … so you can determine what you like/don’t like, and never undervalue your artwork. Also, it’s imperative to join groups such as Mint to gain experience selling your art while also making meaningful connections.”

See her art: Follow her on Instagram for occasional art pieces. View her earlier work on this website. Or perhaps she may join Mint at an alumni art event later in 2021.

What’s next: TaNiah plans to open an Etsy shop to sell resin work, bookmarks and other items. Also her final year Wayne State’s nursing program.

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Heroes earn low wages and high praise – and ours show up in Grand Rapids

The heroes of the covid-19 pandemic wear scrubs and stethoscopes or care for frail seniors. They carry a megaphone, cook eggs and work overnight to refill grocery shelves.

And they show up in the paintings Mint Artists summer workers created last year, which formed our first traveling exhibit Heroes; Now & Then. That exhibit will be on display at the Grand Rapids Art Museum through May 22, with timed ticket entry.  The Heroes show debuted last year in Detroit.

Like many of our Heroes who come from around the globe, America’s heroes are everyday workers who earn a median wage of $10.93 an hour as grocery cashiers or $13.48 an hour for health care jobs including orderlies, health aides and housekeepers. They are considered “essential workers” and lauded by politicians and people who rely on their labor.

Health care workers protest low wages last year. (Photo: Ehimetalor Akhere Unuabona / Unsplash)

And yet these heroes and essential workers face common issues: 55 percent of them live paycheck to paycheck and some 60 percent are taking steps or see others speaking up to improve health conditions at work, a Harris Poll found.  Almost one in four health care workers report reduced income during the pandemic, especially for doctors, paramedics, health technicians and others.

Heroes face distress, stress and fears for themselves and their loved ones as they do their jobs. Many in health care do not believe the hero label will last long.

Yet Mint prefers to believe that heroes – and our hero paintings – will inspire and endure. We hope they encourage valor and thoughtful consideration of who is a hero as well as greater appreciation of the heroes who live among us.

“If enough people hear about their actions, they can inspire others to do something heroic too,” philanthropist Bill Gates wrote in a blog post about seven unsung heroes of the pandemic. One of them is Laxmi Rayamajhi, health care worker in Nepal who hikes for hours to provide contraceptives to women in remote villages.

So take time to read some books about everyday heroes. And please visit our heroes in Grand Rapids or on our website in a booklet Mint prepared.

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Get ahead: Create more art that seems more timely, ahead of time

Last week’s Inauguration celebration of the United States’ first female and first Black Vice President seemed like a remarkable event, and it brought an array of images of Kamala Harris and President Joe Biden to our Instagram feeds.

Some digital, drawn or painted images were created weeks earlier in anticipation of their move to the top of American politics and others were created on the fly.  We recommended to Mint alumni Trinity Brown that she create a wire wrapped necklace similar to the one Vice President Harris wore to her swearing-in.  We suspect fabric fashion designers are recreating  the beautiful Maison Schiaparelli gold dove brooch Lady Gaga wore, signifying her hope for peace in the United States.

Then we realized that creating art that feels like it jumped from the headlines or captures the essence of our cultural experiences is a valuable trait for emerging artists to develop.  Offer art that is fresh, timely and relevant, even if you created it months or years earlier.

How do you do that? First look ahead to memorable or significant moments that resonate with you and your work. Perhaps it’s the reopening of schools after covid-19 vaccinations are widespread, or the the birthday of Rosa Parks, which we mark because of her ties to Detroit and because of our beautiful Mint print based on Mint worker / artist Bryan Wilson’s painting.

Second, set a Google Alert to be notified of news and information about your favorite subjects, those that show up in your art and imagery often. Ask for just the best results; some may provide inspiration or a reason to share your work.

Next create a calendar for yourself of events and dates that suit your

Martin Luther King Jr. collage by artist Isadora Gacel (used with permission)

creative style and interests – or buy our 2021 calendar to inspire and write them in.

If you photograph or paint beautiful buildings, note the birthdays and other significant dates of architects Albert Kahn, Norma Merrick Sklarek and Maya Lin.  If flowers and plants show up often in your images, perhaps key moments for botanist George Washington Carver or Arber or artists Georgia O’Keeffe or Claude Monet belong there. If your art springs from the fight for equality and civil rights, track important dates from Martin Luther King Jr.’s life and work to the anniversary of Breonna Taylor’s death.

Whatever your subject, pour over media timelines and museum retrospectives for dates and events that resonate with you and your art. Look for lesser known events or people or ones that seem newly relevant.

Detail of Arise Rock’s winning triptych painting © Arise Rock

Document the Black Lives Matter movement and the demonstrations after the cruel killing of George Floyd, as Mint Youth Arts Competition winner Arise Rock did.  May 25 will be one year after Floyd died after pleading with police. Or create photos or mixed media slamming the growing gap between rich and poor, known as income or economic inequality.  Unfortunately, these images will be timely again and again.

Keep making more work that suits your cultural moments and themes. That way, when one piece sells, you may share a second and a third.  Consider which one may be powerful enough to be made into a print.

And if you think you’ve missed your moment with Vice President Harris, consider that she will have a very busy first year in office with many moments to shine. Plus she was born on Oct. 20, (1964), so that gives you plenty of time – and a clear deadline – for  creating a portrait or series of pieces about her.

© Vickie Elmer, 2021, for Mint Artists Guild

Watch for our guide to intriguing events in 2021 that may inspire your creative work. Coming up in February in the Mint blog.

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More questions to cultivate as the new year approaches

 

“Fear is a question. What are you afraid of and why? Our fears are a treasure house of self-knowledge if we explore them.” – Marilyn French, author and feminist activist

Fear of the unknown can be powerful, painful and plentiful, especially in a pandemic.

Not knowing what lies ahead may seem like it’s a new problem in the covid era. But in truth, we often are caught by surprise by events and changes we don’t anticipate, whether it’s being fired unexpectedly or a distant relative dying and leaving us a sizable inheritance or the popularity of an exhibit like Heroes: Now and Then

With New Year’s just around the corner, it’s a good time to ask and answer some questions to light our paths and make our creative journeys easier to travel.  Increase your curiosity and you will unearth something valuable about yourself. Here are three we especially like – building on the beautiful questions we posed in the fall:

What did you learn about yourself and your dreams and aspirations in the last year?    Take time to understand how this pandemic year affected your goals and aspirations.  Perhaps you’ll do this through looking back at a vision board made a year ago and creating a new one. Or maybe you will talk to a trusted mentor or friend about this or pull out a journal and draw or write some new dreams.

What one big audacious thing do you wish to complete by Dec. 31, 2021? This question will help you think bigger and bolder about your plans. Chase away caution and triple or quadruple your goals.  Then narrow it down to one wonderful huge, meaningful remarkable goal.

“You’d corner me in your conformity but even in dormancy i’m sleeping with enormity, stretching the belly of the earth & everything i was born to be.” 

– Curtis Tyrone Jones, author and coach

Who do you need in your tribe to grow and thrive?  Everyone needs a tribe or a “kitchen cabinet” of advisors and close allies. Who is in yours? And who do you wish to invite in?  And how are you engaging one or two new people for this near year ahead? These questions invite you to create a circle of supporters, and to connect with teachers, former bosses or family friends who may be able to help your career or your education in the year ahead.  Perhaps you want one of Mint’s leaders to join your tribe. Ask us or join us.

If you want to reflect further on 2020 with timeless questions, turn to these 20 inquires from the Art of Simple, a blog about embracing a slower, less complicated life.  Or if you long for still more questions to answer as you look ahead, read the list of 19 from Brands for the Heart or head to LifeHack for questions to consider the kind of life you want to build. 

“The greatest gift is not being afraid to question,”  said actress, playwright and civil rights activist Ruby Dee.  So we end with another question that drives us:  How will we collaborate to develop more creative opportunities for children and youth and make a bigger difference in Detroit

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Silence: Spoken word artist Ife Martin’s winning poem

We asked young poets to share their words, their passion and their perspective around the prompt of Detroit’s motto:

“We hope for better things. It shall rise from the ashes.”

Ife Martin wrote passionately about Detroit and she performed her piece on Livernois during the debut of the Mint Showcase. She is one of our 2020 Metro Detroit Youth Arts Competition winners, and a high school student from West Bloomfield.

Here is a line from her poem Silence:

Our fire glows against the same moonlit sky that silhouettes our city

A beacon of hope that shines bright through the darkness

A promise – our forever flames burns.”

Poem is © Ife Martin and please see her perform it all in this video, created by Mint marketing director Kelly O’Neill:

Her piece is one of three winners who chose the “rise from the ashes” theme. Other visual pieces are on display in windows along Livernois. as the  Mint Showcase on Livernois continues through Nov. 1.

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Three beautiful questions creatives may ask and answer now

Ask yourself some very good questions to identify your purpose, your direction. (Photo by Emily Morter / Unsplash)

The world is filled with uncertainty and questions. Lots of questions and more questions.

Many of them are irrelevant or lead to nothing but fear and dead ends. Some, though, may help you see the path ahead, your future career or your most valuable contribution.

Questions power the growth of Google and the brilliance of Albert Einstein and the success of many individuals, wrote Thomas Oppong in Medium. He writes about productivity, self-improvement and achieving success.

Eleanor Roosevelt once said: “At a child’s birth, if a mother could ask a fairy godmother to endow it with the most useful gift, that gift should be curiosity.”  If you want some questions to ask your kid sister or a nephew, check out these 20 creative inquiries for children from Minds in Bloom.

So as we face a time of challenge and change, it is time to rev up our curiosity. Let’s start asking ourselves good questions that could lead to something beautiful. Here are three to start:

“What will your essential service be?” This question posed by media queen Oprah Winfrey during virtual college graduations asks you to consider your role in the world, how you will affect humanity.

Why are you here today?  This question could make you probe deep into your purpose in life. Or it could simply help you focus on a short-term goal or project that merits your energy and attention right now.  The here could refer to your neighborhood, your city, the world – or even your dining room table.

What will you create that shines hope or heroism, demands justice or gives aid to the powerless?  This question focuses on your creativity and how you will use it for the greater good. How will you make something that will contribute to the raising of consciousness or the reduction of racism? What wrong will you challenge or what hero will you highlight?

Use these questions as a starting point for conversations with roommates or with family. Or write about them in your journal. Doodle ideas during inktober and draw maps that lead you to a better, brighter more beautiful future.

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From justice to automakers to essential workers, Youth Arts Competition winners are diverse and creative

This colorful piece by Moumita Chawdhury is one of our Youth Arts Competition winners. It represents workers helping the world during covid-19, and people of many faiths unified in prayer for the world. © Moumita Chawdhury.

They live in Detroit, of course, and Hamtramck, Holly and Fraser. They work in crayons, acrylic or watercolor paint, ink and many other mediums. Their creativity and work are as fresh as the latest headlines – and as timeless as the puppy who is part of one child’s picture.

They are the eleven winners of the Metro Detroit Youth Arts Competition, winners, winners whose diversity and creativity make them wonderful representations of Detroit and of Mint Artists Guild’s hopes and expectations.

“We hope for better things, in Detroit. We rise from the ashes, each day, to build our communities. The Youth Arts Competition is a manifestation of our uniquely Detroit spirit of hustle and hope,” said Will ‘The Poet’ Langford. Langford worked with Mint co-founder Vickie Elmer to hustle to launch and develop the competition, starting in June. They both serve on Mint’s board of directors.

The winners range from kindergarden to college and chose a wide variety of subjects for their art and poetry. Mint intends to share more of their stories and work in future blog and social media posts, so here briefly are our 2020 winners:

  • Moumita Chawdhury, 18, Hamtramck, “Unifying, The Hope of a New Beginning,” oil pastels and colored pencils from Bangladesh.
  • Ishaan Kundapur, 13, Northville. “Beautiful Detroit: Birthplace of the Auto Industry,” water color. (Mint greeting card winner)
  • Sydney Lenn, 17, Fraser. “No Justice, No Peace.” Black and white photograph.
  • Ife Martin, 16, West Bloomfield. Silence. Spoken word poem.
  • Tahlia Ray, 16, Detroit. “Unity.” Fiber art.
  • Arise Elisabeth Rock, 15, Detroit. “The Ascension” three-part acrylic painting. And City of People, poem. (Yes, she won twice, though the judges did not know that.)
  • Justus Smith, 10, Detroit. “Rising from the Ashes.” Mixed media piece.
  • Fae Taylor, 6, Hazel Park. “The Daytime.” Mixed media with crayons.
  • Fiona Taylor, 5, Hazel Park. “Puppy’s eyes.” Mixed media with paint. (Yes they are sisters and yes, the puppy piece is adorable!)
  • Aarionna Totty, 9, Holly. “Community Vision.” Mixed media / vision board.
This winning photograph is called “No Justice. No Peace.” It was taken by Sydney Lenn. who also participated in this protest. © Sydney Lenn

Several of the pieces reflected the Black Lives Matter movement or the covid-19 crisis that engulfed the world and how art brings us together in trying times. Others shared the beauty of Detroit, with its leafy trees and lovely streets. About a third of the winners created based on each of our three themes: Detroit is beautiful, art as a unifier and Detroit’s “we rise from the ashes” motto.

Winners were chosen by current Mint Artists, our alumni, professional artists and writers and two of Mint’s co-founders. All of the winning art will be professionally framed by Jo’s Gallery or Sherwood Forest Art Gallery. And all the winners receive a prize package and $225 in cash prizes, underwritten by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and individual donors. Then the art will go on display in Detroit at our partner businesses and at a Mint Showcase along Livernois, known as “the Avenue of Fashion.” Our two poetry winners will share their spoken word in public too. (Winners will receive their art back by yearend to hang in their place of honor. Follow Mint on Facebook or Instagram for details on showings.)

“We want to celebrate youth creativity and business generosity in a competition focused on Detroit’s beauty and resilience and on art as a unifying influence in today’s challenging world,” said Elmer.

Rising from the Ashes is the mixed media piece of 10-year-old Justus Smith of Detroit. This is his first art prize. (© Justus Smith)
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Why we are orchestrating a virtual art fair

The popular Palmer Park Art Fair is not happening this year.

This year is different – so different.

Many many art fairs have been canceled or postponed since March, when states and countries began closing down to protect individuals from COVID-19. Mint Artists Guild artists are not able to sell at the Palmer Park Art Fair and others are in jeopardy this summer.

Our artists have missed out on at least four pop ups, including one in the historic Alger Theater on Detroit’s East Side.

And yet we knew that our artists had been making art during their shelter at home time.  They have worked hard – and some of them are working peacefully to confront racism and unfair treatment. Many face big bills ahead as they prepare to head to the University of Michigan, Georgia State University, College for Creative Studies and elsewhere in the fall.

So Mint Artists Guild is jumping into the unknown by creating its first ever Virtual Art Fair this Saturday, June 6.  Please register here, and invite your friends. Plan to buy something for your Dad, your grad or yourself.  Or plan a brunch and invite in three friends and munch and watch and buy.  The Virtual Art Fair will stream live on our Facebook page and also on our YouTube channel.

We knew little about virtual art events before we started, though our project director Kelly O’Neill had participated in one planned by The Guild.  She is on Mint’s board of directors and creates beautiful sculpture and other pieces from recycled metals.

We want our young artists to sell their work on Saturday – or through the next week.  Yet we know that times are tight and so we need to seek other benefits and possibilities from creating this new event. Here are three of them.

Connect. This new online format gives us wider reach well beyond the Michigan border. With a virtual fair, buyers may live in Dallas or the Mississippi Delta, Queens or Quebec.  Our Mint greeting cards could end up in a gallery in San Francisco or Sanabel Island and so could artists Michael Johnson or Omari June Norman. We think this is important for all artists to grow their audience and connect in new cities.

Learn.  We knew our artists could learn a lot by preparing for the Mint Virtual Art Fair. So we created a workshop that taught them to create an artist studio tour video and to share some of their tricks and techquines. Their videos are an integral part of the fair – and will be valuable to them for future events too.  We are helping them refine their pricing of their art. They are learning too how to focus on and manage multiple priorities:  school,  their creative work, family needs and for some, Black Lives Matter and other peaceful campaigns.

“I always want to stay focused on who I am, even as I’m discovering who I am,” singer Alicia Keys has said.  She’s not performing on Saturday but we have two other amazing musicians who will: Sky Covington and Mahogany Jones.

Pivot.   We want Mint to model adaptability and an entrepreneurial ability to seek out new and different opportunities.  We may not know as much about the digital world as Microsoft, Netflix or Quicken Loans, but we can develop an online sales platform and create new ways of connecting with people through art and storytelling.

This photograph by Mint Alumni Omari June is part of our fair. It is called Frozen in Time – and we are the opposite of that.

You will meet them all the artists on Saturday,  so today I will just tell you that they are wonderful and creative and work in a wide variety of mediums: duct tape, oil paint, photography, mixed media, sterling silver wire and acrylic paint.  Every day we are adding new pieces of their work to the Mint Shop.  Yes, everything already is for sale – and our seven artists and alumni receive almost all the proceeds. Mint takes a 20 percent commission, one of the lowest among nonprofits in Michigan, and charges no fees to join our programs.

“The pessimist seems difficulty in every opportunity. The optimist sees opportunity in every difficulty,” British Prime Minister Winston Churchill one said.  We are the optimists who know that this time, so difficult and horrifying and uncertain, will open doors and create new paths for Mint and for our artists.

Join us on Saturday as we open a beautiful new door.

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Power and beauty and impact of a summer job

Mint summer workers review and critique each other’s work. (Photo © Brendan Ross)

Picture a summer job and you may imagine something quaint and outdoorsy:  a life guard, camp counselor, caddy or park attendant. Or perhaps you recall your first summer job scooping Italian ice, mowing lawns or fixing fast food.  

Yet for many teens, paid work is more likely to be imaginary than real, despite many benefits these jobs bring.  Only about a third of teens worked for pay in 2018, and that has trended down for two decades, according to the Pew Research Center.   The employment rate is likely to tumble further this year, as record unemployment and businesses closed during the pandemic will mean less hiring for young people.  “Paid jobs are scarcer than a Stanford admission,” The Washington Post reported recently.

Mint Artists Guild is an exception, hiring 30 percent more young artists from Detroit and creating more opportunities for work in Detroit. We do this because the need is great and so is the payoff for those hired and their communities. Summer jobs create many positive outcomes, some immediate and some years after the last campfire or painting is finished.  Here’s a look at benefits documented by many academic and other researchers: 

Opportunities grow.  Summer jobs may increase college aspiration and community engagement and they definitely reduce inequality, researchers found.

Safer cities.  Several studies showed reductions in violent crime by up to 43 percent among youth participating in summer jobs, and jobs also lower rates of incarceration in another study. The reduction in youth crime lasted for 15 months after the summer job ended.

Wellbeing improves.  Youth or adults who are employed experience boosts in wellbeing, self-esteem and life satisfaction, just by working eight hours a week. Researchers also note they are more likely to get through trying circumstances than others.

A summer job creates many benefits to the worker and to society. (Photo Bruce Mars / Unsplash)

Future earnings.  Working during college, whether part-time or full-time, leads to to higher earnings after graduation. This research by Rutgers University and others is based on 160,000 students;  jobs add to students’ networks, skills and post-college paychecks. The amount varied from $1,035 to $20,625. But the post-college premium showed up for a wide variety of students, regardless of their race, type of university or previous work experience.

Academic achievement rises.  In the year after summer jobs in Boston, researchers calculated a “small but significant” improvement in GPAs. Young workers were also more likely to graduate from high school on time. Academic improvements were “particularly large” when youth in New York were hired for several summers in a row. “Participating in summer jobs programming for multiple years pays dividends for high school students well beyond the paycheck itself,” New York University researchers wrote.

Mint’s summer creative jobs program teaches productivity and professionalism as well as painting and artistic skills.  We will create original paintings for our fifth annual Paint Detroit with Generosity initiative. This year, the jobs will take place from youth homes, as required by our partner Grow Detroit’s Young Talent, and will feature new online workshops on managing clients, writing an artist statement and digital work etiquette.

If you want to support our Lucky 13 artists, we invite you to donate to our spring fundraiser – or become a monthly donor now.

Donate now

© Vickie Elmer, 2020, for Mint Artists Guild